What Is The Name Of This Plant?

On 06 March 2011, my hiking buddy, Paul Basco, and I photographed this stunningly alabaster fruit during our climb at Mt. Cristobal in Quezon Province.

I posted the photo on Facebook the following day and questions pertaining to the name of this particular plant ensued. Unfortunately, I don’t know the answer.

I have already consulted Mr. Google a million times not to mention asked the botanists of Palanan Co Sierra Madre Trek and some of the highbrows I know three years ago but to no avail.

Please help!

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65 thoughts on “What Is The Name Of This Plant?

    • Thanks! It really is. That’s why I should, at least, know the name of this plant. I’m still ferreting out the name as of June 15, 2011 – when I decided to make this post sticky.

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      • don’t tell me until now that unknown plant is still a mystery, what are these experts waiting for 2013. you sir are a one lucky guy :-D

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  1. Pingback: The Bountiful Mount Cristobal | Stories of My Wandering Feet & Mind

    • Pleased to meet you, Happy Sole! I’d be one lucky man if it’s a new species. Hehe … I did post it on the walls of National Geographic Asia and other websites that I know can help. Unfortunately, I got no answer.

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    • Of the whole thing … Did you mean from root to tip (like a hair)? I have more than one picture of that subject in my cam though which can give a closer look at how the vine looks.

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      • Yep, from root to tip. I guess it would be of great help to those experts identify the plant if they have the picture of the whole thing (like how the leaves etc. look like).

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  2. You can also asks various natural science teachers in different school.But I doubt they’ll know but its worth the try. If it isn’t named yet, you can present it to the scientist. You can name it yourself :]

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  4. I coulden’t tell you what it is, but I’de say you photographed a open
    seedpod and are looking at seeds. Mountains in tropical regions are
    said to be covered with undescribed species. That you may have
    found a new one is very possible. I would try comparing it’s leaves –
    if you can remember them – to known species. If you can find out
    what plants your vine is related to – you might be able to identify it,
    or at least look up a plant scientist. That specializes in the family.
    They might know if there is a name for what you’ve discovered.

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  5. It looks like fungus to me. *chuckles* Reminiscent of peeled lychees stuck to a tree.
    I agree with the suggestions above and consult teachers in botany. Wouldn’t it be cool if this is actually a new discovery?

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    • Now you mention it – the “seeds” do resemble the
      spore pellets of splash cups, a fungus common in
      my own back yard. Fungus or not – the way it’s
      growing along a stem suggests that it might be
      an organism seperate from it’s host – like a
      bromeliad or Miseltoe.

      Though the seeds pods of the coco tree -
      where we get chololate – do seem to grow
      out of it’s trunk.

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  6. isnt it an egg? a cross breed between a plant and an animal! LOL! just kidding! Its amazing to find such beautiful flower… or fruit… or… anyway! nice find sir! if its a new specie though, you could claim it and name it… the SONY FLOWER! hehehe! More power to you sir!^_^

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  7. To identify it, you have to explain more about the plant itself. Is it a water plant, epiphytic (like for example bromeliads), climbing, bush etc.

    Tree frog eggs look similar to those pearly bubbles. Some tiny tree frogs lay their eggs inside bromeliad plants or on leaves. Or…. maybe some kind of lizard that laid eggs on top of a flower stem???

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