My “NZT-48” Story


(Photo Credit: Google Images)

When I looked at the calendar today while browsing my blog, I noticed that I haven’t had a single story yet with regard to my teaching career in “that” university since I started filling up this blog site in January 2010. With this, I just inferred that it’s time to post my first teaching experience in one of that university’s sharpening rooms and because it’s been more than a year since I secured my liliputian cathedra in the academe.

Let me start by remembering the day I was put through a sieve by the masters. 02 June 2009 was the first day of another series of Herculean tests where the demo was my favorite part. I enormously enjoy the feeling of nervousness when I’m performing in front of highbrowed people capable of gauging one’s value.

This paragraph will somehow explain that. “Welcome to the university!” That’s what the masters said after my demo. Whoppee! And so I thought the succeeding tasks would be easier until I was informed of the subject I will handle.

Pusillanimity came knocking on my door upon knowing that the subject is no ordinary one because it is equated to a Review and Training Center–for the Civil Service Stenographer Examination (CSSE). Let me make that clearer. The subject description is Refresher Course and my primary task is to review seniors for the CSSE. That was the reason why I was hesitant to push on the position given to me at that point. Logic says that the subject should be handled by a Professor (i.e., a college instructor with a high, if not highest, academic rank). A college teacher who possesses a reservoir of mentoring experience, talent, and skills in the field. On the contrary, I still took the class list and the teaching load though my mind was screaming the word “NO!”

A week before the semester started, I watched this movie starring Michelle Pfeiffer (Dangerous Minds) and it inspired me to do the same. Handling and teaching a bundle of social rejects is no easy task, especially for first-timers like us, yet she took it. Though mine has a different setting, I also took that biggest test–so far in my teaching career–and that made all the difference. The movie taught me the importance of having an exceptional courage in the field of education.

There’s no better way to recognize this movie than to consider it my version of NZT-48 at that particular time.

Seriously, I owed the courage to boldly face the challenge of reviewing seniors in the sharpening room for the Civil Service Stenographer Examination to that movie–the biggest and most challenging task I was talking about. I now understand why it ranked second on the list of Top Ten Inspirational Movies for Educators.

Fate has its ineffable way of making you embrace the ironies it gives you. The once abhorring title, as a stenographer, eventually became adorable especially when I discovered that skill in stenography is a rarity nowadays. Moreover, it initiated the existence of my cathedra in the academe. I thought the license would get the masters’ attention more than the certificate for passing the Civil Service Stenographer Exam but the latter turned out to be my edge.

For years, I have resisted the call nevertheless I am happy that I finally heeded the day I accepted my most challenging task, That is, the day I officially practiced the noblest profession and vowed to mold the precious minds of the younger, as well as older, people.

I am now proud, and boastful, that I am dedicating some of my time to this noble profession that is actually more of a vocation: TEACHING.

PS

For the government’s financial assistance to my education, this is the least I can do in return. For the school who honed me and for the rest of the Filipino people, this is the best I can do to give back.

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2 thoughts on “My “NZT-48” Story

  1. Pingback: First Teaching Experience in the “Real World” | Yobynos' Blog

  2. Pingback: Room 303: My First Sharpening Room | Yobynos' Blog: The Stories of My Wandering Feet & Mind

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