Hidden Valley: An Ancient Arabian Treasure In Its Own Right


One of the things that I find most interesting about the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is its fairly barren terrain. It is something truly pulchritudinous to someone rising from the Far East. Philippines has a completely different surface features. The kingdom boasts countless free-for-the-eyes rock formations so a traveler’s lens will have all the panoramic views, among other subjects, to feast on.

The Hidden Valley (Wadi Nissah), which is located at approximately 80 kilometers southwest of the capital city and only a fifteen-minute drive from the quad biking central (Red Sand), is one of the ancient places that brandish such feature. The valley is fortressed by some of the kingdom’s most towering autochthonous rocky hills. Hence, the name Hidden Valley. This spot is a geographical site to lay eyes on where vast sandstone and granite ridges ascend from desert sands to create spectacular shapes due to years of erosion from desert springs.

Hidden Valley does not only feed the optical organs with awesome rock outcrops; it also gives hiking warriors an opportunity to hop on the battlefield—a salivating treat for the wandering feet.

Clambering onto the bristly ridges on the way to the peak is an absolute requirement.

Given the choice, I would have gotten to not only one but to every peak of visible Rockies in the area.

The most striking charms of the valley are seen at the rocky hills’ respective highest points. At that platform, savoring the entirety of the place is literally breathtaking—the blue skies, the sandstone walls of the mighty fortress, the dense foliage of few shrubs along the perimeter, and the quiet dunes visible in the distance. Everything in sight is just disarming (except for the “almost petroglyphs” grotesquely scrawled on the nearby cliff).

I cannot help kudizing the sun that was on deck by giving the amount of light enough to help me doff the valley’s glory.

Being in the valley on that fateful day of 19 October 2012 did not only satisfy my feet’s longing for hiking and my eyes’ craving for natural views but my soul’s aching for connection with the Aura up in the skies. Conversing with Him at the peak of a high place is as good as whispering my thoughts into His ear.

How to get to Hidden Valley? Click here for the map.

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17 thoughts on “Hidden Valley: An Ancient Arabian Treasure In Its Own Right

  1. Hey, Sony, that’s one great place to meditate. I can consume a full hydration pack just to spend a half day there; we can pray anywhere but that place is humbling, makes you leave any earthly feelings. Frankly, thanks for the share of pictures. 🙂

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  2. The dramatic landscape here looks amazing. Love the contrast of the blue sky and orange/red rocks. By the way, I’ve got a GF2 as well. Isn’t it a great camera? I use it all of the time, while my regular DSLR just sits gathering dust!

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  3. Gorgeous, gorgeous, gorgeous images! I wouldn’t mind the extreme heat or extreme cold if this is what my views are. Such magnificent landscape. I so love rock formation, so just imagine my envy. EXCELLENT POST, kabayan.

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  4. Wow Sony! These photos are beyond awesome my friend! I just love the rock formations. This looks like a great place for reflection and rejuvenation. Mind, body and spirit are three words that come to mind when I look at these photos. I could stare at these photos for hours, but there are only so many hours left in this day! 🙂

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  7. What a beautiful treasure hidden in a part of Saudi Arabia. Those rock formations must have been around for years, certainly a part of history of the Kingdom. Don’t know if that’s you in the last photo, but that person looks really small against the rocks – nature is always more powerful than we think, always so grand and so beautiful…and yet never speaks a word until we stop and give our full attention to it’s whispering winds or the silence of its still breath.

    Amazing captures, Sony. Great angle and focus, and the bright sunlight certainly didn’t overexpose the shots. Someday I hope to learn how to use a camera to get such shots 🙂

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    • Thank you so much, Mabel. One of the many things I learned from traveling is that you don’t need extra effort to bring out the beauty of a place if the place is naturally beautiful.

      You got me humbled when you said you hope to learn how to use a camera to get similar shots. Mabel, I am sorry to disagree. I certainly believe you already did. Your pictures are way better than mine. Always remember that.

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